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When you want more from a gateway

Gateways are great. That’s because they enable communications where otherwise, it would be impossible. Impossible that is other than by using something else. Funnily enough, that something else is often a monolithic PBX that is made to mimic the functions of a gateway. Less amusing is that such a solution is often far more expensive, and involves capital outlay on something inherently obsolete.

If you’re migrating to all-IP communications, you’re unlikely to want your remote office, legacy PBX interworking solution to be another legacy PBX. Really and truly, you don’t want to burden yourself with such an anachronism. So don’t go for a costly ‘something else’ when you can use a purpose designed gateway. Simply put, gateways make sense.

Having invested in gateways as part of your IP migration strategy, you might be interested in getting more from your gateway.

In the typical transition scenario, your gateway is likely to be sitting in a rack alongside your legacy PBX equipment. Its purpose is to buy you time before you have to replace that legacy equipment. And in that meantime, it’s one more box in your server room. When you purchase the replacement IP-PBX, you may well think about tossing the gateway into the skip together with your old PBX. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

Your new PBX need not be hardware-based. It can be software-based, in which case, you will need a platform in which to install it. That platform can be your gateway. Of course, it can’t be just any gateway. It has to be an open gateway appliance presenting an integral virtual machine (VM) platform on which you can run third party applications.

Such a gateway presents at least a dozen advantages:

  • Keep your existing equipment
  • Avoid additional hardware investment
  • Avoid adding another device to your collection
  • Run your software-based IP-PBX on existing hardware
  • Save on monthly call costs using SIP Trunks
  • Achieve a logical separation of equipment functions, in a single box
  • Create custom OEM solutions with your choice of third party applications
  • Retain a PSTN failover connection for branch office survivability
  • Continue to benefit from SIP, DPNSS and QSIG interworking
  • Replace your branch office PBXs to an affordable schedule
  • Transition trouble-free to all-IP communications
  • Benefit from an all-in-one ‘communications hub’

An application platform gateway enables you to run many applications, including:

  • IP-PBX
  • Business VoIP system
  • Router
  • Firewall
  • Fax server
  • SBC
  • Soft switch
  • Unified Communications
  • Call recorder
  • Call accounting software
  • Conference Bridge

If you are interested in an application platform gateway with an integral VM on which you can install third party applications, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information.

Archive

The Aculab blog

News, views and industry insights from Aculab

  • Preparing to meet the EU GDPR rules with Aculab Cloud

    Firstly, lets establish what the GDPR is, and why it’s important to Aculab and its customers in the EU region, and also for our non-EU customers who use Aculab Cloud for their customers who reside in the EU.

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  • Improved Aculab Cloud documentation and a new console

    We’ve been busy in the background recently at Aculab with a major website refresh. Aculab has evolved over decades (40 years this year!) from a vendor supplying hardware to a much more software-centric product company. We still sell telecom gateways extensively, but nowadays the bulk of our enabling technology business is software, and in particular our communications platform-as-a-service (CPaaS) product, Aculab Cloud.

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  • Interoperability is predictable

    Way back in 2007, while presenting a seminar in Prague, someone asked me for my prediction on when SS7 would no longer be in use. My answer was suitably vague, but something on the lines of, “at least 10 to 15 years.” Ten years on, I wasn’t wrong. Still, I may not be right. SS7 is showing its age, but it’s not about to draw its pension just yet.

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  • Fax is not yet dead

    You might think that fax would be as extinct as the Martinique Parrot. That parrot vanished in the 17th Century. Fax was invented two hundred years later, by the Scottish clockmaker, Alexander Bain. It took a while though, until the late 20th Century, for facsimile machines to become popular. However, if the lack of commentary by the majority of today’s technology observers is anything to go by, you’d be forgiven for thinking it too had died out. The truth is that it remains extant, and it shows little sign of going the way of the Martinique.

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  • “Daoruni gimi, Ionos Sonaro.” *

    Languages, eh; who would have thought that in the 21st Century there would still be so much diversity?

    In Westeros, in the world of George R. R. Martin’s epic Game of Thrones, there are spoken only two major languages – the Old Tongue and the Common Tongue. But what about computer languages?

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