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Intel has seen the light. I’m not talking light at the end of the tunnel here, because it can’t be said of Intel that it’s scrambling its way forward. It’s more like the light of revelation. What it saw were the myriads of power-on LEDs, like a constellation in the night sky, lighting up the data centres of hyper-scalers Amazon and Google. The cosmic dawn took a long time coming. Intel’s epiphany moment has arrived in rather less time.

Since my blog post triggered by the announcement of the acquisition of Tropo by Cisco (completed in May), comes a fresh endorsement of the legitimacy of cloud-based telecommunications platforms.

Media servers have played an important role in enabling many of the real-time – and non-real-time – telecommunications applications with which we are all familiar. Those interactive applications include many things we take for granted. They include network announcements (e.g., the ‘speaking clock’), voicemail, IVR, unified messaging (which has morphed into unified communications), and outbound diallers (think campaigns and collections).

Whatever else you might think about Cisco’s announcement1 of its intent to acquire Tropo, one thing is clear. And it is that suddenly, real-time communications cloud APIs have been given a seal of approval.

Did you know that Aculab Cloud has the ability to support toll free numbers in forty countries worldwide?

That’s pretty extensive for a cloud telecom API platform, some of which only support a handful of countries. So if you have an application that would benefit your customers by having toll free inbound calling capability, and you need to roll it out across Europe, the US or Asia, then keep reading.

Archive

The Aculab blog

News, views and industry insights from Aculab

  • Jail time for biometrics

    The people who work in the Broadville Retention Centre, a temporary home for semi-retired hoodlums, love working there. The centre in south-west London, England, has views of flightpaths from Heathrow Airport; sights evocative of the freedom temporarily denied its residents. Workers at the centre on the other hand enjoy freedom of movement, not only in coming and going according to their shift patterns, but also within the building complex.

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  • Aculab Cloud and the EU GDPR

    The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is important to Aculab and its customers in the EU region, and also for our non-EU customers who use Aculab Cloud for their customers who reside in the EU. This is a summary of what we have done to ensure the privacy and security of customer data on Aculab Cloud.

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  • Preparing to meet the EU GDPR rules with Aculab Cloud

    Firstly, lets establish what the GDPR is, and why it’s important to Aculab and its customers in the EU region, and also for our non-EU customers who use Aculab Cloud for their customers who reside in the EU.

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  • Improved Aculab Cloud documentation and a new console

    We’ve been busy in the background recently at Aculab with a major website refresh. Aculab has evolved over decades (40 years this year!) from a vendor supplying hardware to a much more software-centric product company. We still sell telecom gateways extensively, but nowadays the bulk of our enabling technology business is software, and in particular our communications platform-as-a-service (CPaaS) product, Aculab Cloud.

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  • Interoperability is predictable

    Way back in 2007, while presenting a seminar in Prague, someone asked me for my prediction on when SS7 would no longer be in use. My answer was suitably vague, but something on the lines of, “at least 10 to 15 years.” Ten years on, I wasn’t wrong. Still, I may not be right. SS7 is showing its age, but it’s not about to draw its pension just yet.

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