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Aculab participates in NG112 Communications Plugtest in Europe

Making our solutions interoperable

10th March 2017, Milton Keynes, UK – Aculab, a leading provider of deployment proven telephony products to the global communications market, is delighted to announce its participation in the Next Generation 112 Communications Plugtests event, held on 6-10 March in Sophia-Antipolis, France and organised by ETSI and EENA.

The purpose of the event was to trial independently and jointly all components of the 112 communication chain based on NG112 networks. While the 2016 edition worked on voice and geo-localization, this year the focus was on content-rich emergency calling with existing IMS/RCS services such as video calling, instant messaging, file transfers, and more.

Aculab’s GroomerII gateway, which was exercised during the Plugtest, forms a key element of the EENA NG112 Long Term Definition (LTD) defined Legacy Network Gateway (LNG). In its capacity as the Protocol Interworking Function (PIF) front-end, Aculab’s gateway acts as the critical interworking interface for emergency calls between legacy switching equipment in fixed and mobile carriers’ exchange offices and the EENA LTD defined Emergency Services Internetwork (ESInet).

“This has been another valuable learning experience for Aculab, following on from last year’s event. Testing our products against different scenarios has great value, but the key-outcome was the lessons we learned together with the other participants. These lessons will allow us to continue optimising our products to provide the best access to emergency services for people from around the world, said Ian Colville, Gateways Product Manager at Aculab.”

“Next Generation technology is ready for us to use. More importantly, it is future-proof as it can continuously integrate new features.” said Cristina Lumbreras, EENA Technical Director. “Emergency services need to adopt NG112 solutions, one of the best investments they can make to provide the highest quality of services to their citizens.”

About ETSI

ETSI produces globally-applicable standards for Information and Communications Technologies (ICT), including fixed, mobile, radio, aeronautical, broadcast and internet technologies and is officially recognized by the European Union as a European Standards Organization. ETSI is an independent, not-for-profit association whose almost 800 member companies and organizations, drawn from 64 countries, determine its work programme and participate directly in its work.

About EENA

EENA is a Brussels-based NGO dedicated to contributing to high-quality emergency services. EENA serves as a discussion platform for emergency services, public authorities, decision makers, researchers, associations and solution providers with a view to improving the emergency response in accordance with citizens' requirements. EENA is also promoting the establishment of an efficient system for alerting citizens about imminent or developing emergencies. EENA memberships include more than 1300 emergency services representatives from over 80 countries world-wide, 80 solution providers, 15 international associations/organisations, more than 200 Members of the European Parliament and more than 90 researchers.

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