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Rampant cloud communications

Since my blog post triggered by the announcement of the acquisition of Tropo by Cisco (completed in May), comes a fresh endorsement of the legitimacy of cloud-based telecommunications platforms.

I came across a study by IDC1, a premier global provider of market intelligence and advisory services, offering yet more evidence – as if any were needed – of the global demand for cloud communications platforms.

According to the report’s author, Mark Winther, Group Vice President and Consulting Partner, Worldwide Telecommunications, providers of cloud communications platforms are “leveraging cloud economics” in order to “create low-cost and richly contextualised IP communications.”

The IDC report forecasts stratospheric CAGR figures for global revenues, rising from the present hundred-millions to several billions, in a mere three years time. However sceptical you might be about the accuracy of such numbers, they are usually correct in their orders of magnitude. So the communications market is on the growth path after some years of sliding revenue and a lack of innovation by the industry as a whole.

The growth is being driven by cloud communications platform providers, such as Tropisco (mentioned above) and Aculab Cloud.

According to IDC, the appeal of these cloud communications platforms is “an ability to prototype an application in a day and bring an application to production scale in a few weeks as well as do this for a fraction of the cost of traditional telephony systems.”

If you fancy some of that, contact us here at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; we’d be happy to help you take your fist steps down that path.

By leveraging a carrier interconnect model, cloud communications platforms such as Aculab Cloud can deliver voice, fax and text messaging at rates substantially below traditional carrier retail rates.

And the best bit?

All the telecommunications resources you need are available – and scalable – on demand, where and when you need them, and for as long as you need them (no more, no less).

Furthermore, for application developers, corporate enterprises, and Internet start-ups, the cloud model offers a rapid market entry without the fuss and bother of technology capital investment. That means you can focus on your creativity and innovation, and let Aculab Cloud take care of the telephony nuts ‘n’ bolts.

Note 1: Get the IDC report, entitled Worldwide Cloud Communications Platforms 2014–2018 Forecast: The Resurgence of Voice and SMS.

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