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Gateways are great. That’s because they enable communications where otherwise, it would be impossible. Impossible that is other than by using something else. Funnily enough, that something else is often a monolithic PBX that is made to mimic the functions of a gateway. Less amusing is that such a solution is often far more expensive, and involves capital outlay on something inherently obsolete.

What can cloud telephony enable you to do that previously hasn’t been economically viable for both enterprises and SMBs?

This post touches on a particular area into which cloud telephony is set to breathe new life. It will focus on the impact a cloud telephony approach can have on the uptake of premium tools/resources, such as speech recognition and synthetic speech, to the benefit of businesses, both large and small.

Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems are widely used to provide automated call handling for businesses. But sometimes for the caller, remembering which digit to press to connect to a certain department is not so straightforward, and can be time consuming. In addition, with the prevalence of smartphones, it can be somewhat annoying to have to listen to the prompts, then bring up the numeric keypad display on the phone before you can enter your digit choice. Wouldn't it be simpler if the caller could just speak the name of the department they required or speak the digits of a PIN code? Well, they can, using automated speech recognition technology, ASR.

With 55 percent of those asked in a recent survey report “Cloud as a Journey: The Reality of Cloud-based Solutions” (1) stating that within the next four years they will offer Cloud or Web-based systems (higher than ever before), evidence points towards Cloud becoming the de-facto architecture for contact centres – inbound or outbound.

Nothing is as constant as change. Is that true? It’s an old adage, but probably not strictly accurate. Change might be ever present, but the pace of change is fluctuating all the time. So change itself isn’t constant – it speeds up and slows down, sometimes erratically, but it’s always apparent.

Archive

The Aculab blog

News, views and industry insights from Aculab

  • Jail time for biometrics

    The people who work in the Broadville Retention Centre, a temporary home for semi-retired hoodlums, love working there. The centre in south-west London, England, has views of flightpaths from Heathrow Airport; sights evocative of the freedom temporarily denied its residents. Workers at the centre on the other hand enjoy freedom of movement, not only in coming and going according to their shift patterns, but also within the building complex.

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  • Aculab Cloud and the EU GDPR

    The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is important to Aculab and its customers in the EU region, and also for our non-EU customers who use Aculab Cloud for their customers who reside in the EU. This is a summary of what we have done to ensure the privacy and security of customer data on Aculab Cloud.

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  • Preparing to meet the EU GDPR rules with Aculab Cloud

    Firstly, lets establish what the GDPR is, and why it’s important to Aculab and its customers in the EU region, and also for our non-EU customers who use Aculab Cloud for their customers who reside in the EU.

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  • Improved Aculab Cloud documentation and a new console

    We’ve been busy in the background recently at Aculab with a major website refresh. Aculab has evolved over decades (40 years this year!) from a vendor supplying hardware to a much more software-centric product company. We still sell telecom gateways extensively, but nowadays the bulk of our enabling technology business is software, and in particular our communications platform-as-a-service (CPaaS) product, Aculab Cloud.

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  • Interoperability is predictable

    Way back in 2007, while presenting a seminar in Prague, someone asked me for my prediction on when SS7 would no longer be in use. My answer was suitably vague, but something on the lines of, “at least 10 to 15 years.” Ten years on, I wasn’t wrong. Still, I may not be right. SS7 is showing its age, but it’s not about to draw its pension just yet.

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